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Operating Bicycles on Town Roadways & Paved Paths

Bike LanesMost streets in the Town of Breckenridge have either an unstriped or a striped, paved shoulder with no other bicycle route demarcation. Bicyclists and motorists are expected to follow state laws regarding the operation of vehicles on public roadways. Those include:

• Bicyclists have all the rights and duties applicable to the driver of any other vehicle and can be penalized for violating traffic laws.
• Motorists and bicyclists are required to obey all traffic laws, signs, and signals.
• Motorists are required to provide three feet of clearance when passing bicyclists.
• Bicyclists should ride in the right lane and as far right as safely possible, except when passing another vehicle, preparing for a left turn, or avoiding hazards.
• Bicyclists should ride on paved shoulders and bike lanes when present and free of hazards.
• Bicyclists should ride no more than two abreast, returning to single-file if riding two abreast impedes traffic flow.
• Bicyclists should use hand signals to indicate left or right turns, slowing or stopping
• Bicyclists should use a headlight, taillight, and reflectors at nighttime.
• Expect the unexpected; your first responsibility is to be safe.
(Source: Bicycle Colorado) 

Bike Lanes
Bike LaneA bike lane includes a white line stripe with a bicyclist icon and arrow. Examples of this bike facility within Town of Breckenridge limits include Main Street, Watson Avenue, Park Avenue and the alley one half block west of Main Street.
• A bike lane indicates that motor vehicles and bicycles can operate side by side on the roadway, with each user in a separate lane.
• The white line indicates that motor vehicles may not travel in the bike lane, but can cross the bike lane for turning and parking movements after yielding to bikes.
• Dashed portions of the bike lane alert bicyclists to expect vehicles to be crossing the bike lane frequently, such as at bus stops or intersections where vehicles are turning.
• Bicyclists must obey all traffic laws while in the bike lane, including signalizing turns and stopping for pedestrians in crosswalks.

Sharrow 2A shared lane marking (sharrow) is a painted symbol used on roads to:
• Assist bicyclists in lateral positioning in a shared lane with on-street parallel in order to reduce the chance of a bicyclist’s impacting the open door of a parked vehicle.
• Assist bicyclists with lateral positioning in lanes that are too narrow for a motor vehicle and bicycle to travel side by side within the same traffic lane.
• Reduce the incidence of wrong-way bicycling.
• Encourage safe passing of bicyclists by motorists.
• Alert road users of lateral location of bicyclists within the travel lane.
(Source: MUTCD, 2009)

Examples of “sharrow” bike routes in the Town of Breckenridge include Wellington Road, French Street, Airport Road and the signalized intersections on Main Street.
• The same rules apply for sharrow routes and Town roadways. The primary intent of the sharrow is to inform both motorists and bicyclists regarding lateral positioning within the travel lane.
• Motorists are required to provide three feet of clearance when passing bicyclists.

Recreational Pathway or “Rec Path”
Junior Bike Path UserThe Town of Breckenridge contains a section of the world-class, 50+ mile paved Summit County Recreational Pathway system. The Town of Breckenridge’s seven mile section, known as the “Blue River Rec Path,” connects the center of town with the rest of Summit County, and even Eagle County via Vail Pass.
The name “Rec Path” recognizes that these routes accommodate runners, hikers, dog walkers, inline skaters, anglers, as well as bicyclists. Please use common sense and courtesy when encountering all users on the Rec Path system.

While Colorado has no statewide statues regulating multi-use trails, here is a list of suggested practices when using these multi-use Rec Paths:

• Always ride, walk, or skate on the right side of the trail.
• Obey traffic control signs and markings on trail, including stop signs.
• Slow down when the trail is crowded, and travel at speeds that are safe and appropriate to trail conditions
• Pass on the left, when oncoming pathway traffic is clear.
• Give an audible warning before overtaking other pathway users.
• Ring your bike bell. 
• Loudly and clearly call out "Passing" or “On your left”.
• Listen up! Headphones prevent you from hearing warnings.
• Use hand signals to indicate turns and stops.
• When stopping, pull off the side of the pathway so that traffic is not impeded.
• Ride single file so that other users may pass safely.
• Anticipate unexpected movements from other users, especially with children or dogs.
(Source: Bicycle Colorado)
Last updated: 6/2/2016 2:15:42 PM